Friday, February 05, 2010

Is YouTube Making Training Obsolete?

video

I was not too sure about this until I watched a YouTube video that helped me do something I had never done before (make a video with my computer's integrated webcam to post on my blog), now I think YouTube is going to give technical training, at least, a run for its money...I might have actually taken a training course on this...

5 comments:

PennyWalker said...

Hi Gillian

I agree! Videos can be a great way to learn a skill like that.

And have you come across this great one on how to darn a sock? I found it via a transition town link, but it seems it was posted by a 'green' clothing and fabric supplier.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4nY1jTVyBE0

Penny

Gillian Martin Mehers said...

Hi Penny, I loved the video on sock darning, and it only took Gina 9 minutes and 18 seconds to do it (long for a YouTube video but short for what I had imagined it would take to darn a sock so successfully). Video is such a rich way to share this kind of how-to knowledge and far superior to trying to write a Fact Sheet on how to do something like darn a sock (or run a particular teambuilding game, or make a video for that matter!)

Gillian Martin Mehers said...

Just to add, I was informed by my husband that I look tired in this video and that I should reshoot it. I guess there is something to post-production work, or pre-production practice and environment check (e.g. combing of hair, lighting, etc.) that adds some useful value to the whole video learning format. Next time!

Cecilia said...

I also loved the video on darning socks. Not that I'm ready to do this but how clever to learn via a short video. Gillian, I tried yours too but I guess you're updating it now. Great tip. Thanks, Cecilia

Gillian Martin Mehers said...

Jim Lundy, vice president and general manager of collaboration at Saba, in a CLO webinar discusses the top eight trends in collaborative tools for 2010, including (and notice NUMBER 5):
1. Learning connections will matter as much as learning transactions.
2. Connecting people to expertise will become an enterprise priority.
3. Employees will demand and receive continuous feedback.
4. The traditional organization chart will be replaced by social network analysis maps.
5. Video will emerge as the way that people want to learn and collaborate.
6. Mobile learning will finally come of age.
7. Informal processes will be valued and encouraged — they will be social and real time.
8. The most successful companies will value collective competencies more than individual competencies.