Sunday, November 09, 2008

What's Winning? Check Your Assumptions

Did you know that in unicycle races, it is the last person that crosses the finish line that wins? That is because it is much harder, and takes more skill to ride a unicycle slowly.

Sound counter-culture? What is it about our social norms that make us assume that bigger, faster, and more, is better than smaller, slower and less?

The sustainability community asks a similar question - why are high growth rates and GNP standard indicators of success? How can we help society see growing more skillfully, and possibly even more slowly, as akin to winning?

Even at work, winning sometimes seems to be about having the largest team, largest project portfolio and the most money - this can set up unhelpful competition among people with shared overall goals. Maybe we could flip "winning" to the team that collaborates most and generates more work and resources for other teams. Let's follow those unicyclists. Let's change the rules.


Wiebke Herding said...

Good point. So why is it a bad thing if our economy shrinks by 0.2% next year? Why is it bad if we start using less resources? What will the implications be for our wellbeing?

Gillian Martin Mehers said...

Yes, if we can redefine what winning is, maybe we can also redefine for ourselves what "wellbeing" means...